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Frequently Asked Questions

by Nannies

Why become a night nanny?
When we look for people to join MDT we want people that are teachable with a helpers spirit and a love for snuggling babies! It is a privilege for a family to let you be a part of this new journey and something we take very seriously.
How many nights a week are typically worked?
The most common request is 3-5 nights a week, Most of the time staggering nights Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday works best for both you and the client to get adequate rest. Some clients will request Sunday through Thursday while their spouse is working. We recommend 8-9 hour shifts between the hours of 9pm to 8am. During the interview process you will sign a contract with what you and the parents agree too.
How long is a night  nanny shift?
You are usually scheduled in 8-9 hour overnight shifts. Overnight shifts range between the hours of 9pm-8am. During the interview process with your client, we highly encourage completing a contract with the number of days and agreed upon hours.
What does a night nanny do overnight?
The first priority is the care of the baby/babies. You will perform light housework that pertains to the baby/babies such as, washing bottles and breast pump equipment, preparing formula and helping with the baby laundry. If the baby is sleeping and all chores are complete, you may lie down and rest.
How long do you stay with a family?
A typical job, you will stay with the family from the moment the baby arrives home from the hospital through some time in the first year. The average stay with single babies is 8-12 weeks and with multiples 16-20 weeks. Most singles start 3-5 days a week and twins 5-7 nights a week and then reduce the nights as the family feels comfortable. We believe that the needs of each family vary, so we encourage you to be flexible with the hours, the number of days and the length of stay. The more availability/ flexibility you have will increase your earning potential.
Where does a night nanny stay?
When you have the initial meeting discuss what works best for the family. We often stay in the nursery, guest room, or living room with the baby/babies.
How much infant care experience is necessary?
At least two years of infant care experience is preferred. Whether that was with your own children, a nursery, or as a nanny. If you do not have the experience yet, you can volunteer with friends, a nursery, or ask to shadow another night nanny in your area.
What is the  annual income?

This varies on experience, location, and availability. If you work 3-4 nights a week for 45 weeks out of the year at $175 then you would make $23,000-$31,500 per year. We do not suggest making this your primary source of income. Sometimes babies sleep through the night early and the parents give a two weeks notice earlier than expected, or you have babies born early that are in NICU. This is great side income for someone who loves snuggling munchkins!

Let's talk sleep.

Before deciding to become a night nanny, you need to make sure that you will have appropriate time to rest and that you are a light sleeper. In the interview process, you will discuss that your job is to take care of the baby/babies and any infant-related chores. After that, we recommend lightly resting wherever the baby/ babies are located. However, you must make sure that you have rested before going in, because it is unacceptable to fall asleep while holding a baby or to sleep through an infant's cries.


What are parents looking for in a night nanny?

—Non smoker (most parents will not even consider a smoker)
—CPR and First Aid Certification
—Flu/TDAP shots 
—Background screening and drug test
—Infant training

What do I get with the MDT training?

You get access to a 70+ video library that includes newborn skills, business advice, what to do with multiples, and more!
—Private facebook community that has access to experts and other night nannies

—Annual background screening and drug test

—With our yearly subscription, you will be featured on the directory so that parents in your area can contact you

What about COVID? And what if I get sick?

COVID-19 guidelines: We strongly recommend that if they have been exposed to COVID that you self quarantine for 2 weeks and do not return to work until you cannot transmit it. We also recommend that you wear a mask at all times in a client's home.

We recommend that if you have a cough or runny nose that you wear a mask. If you have any GI or fever, we suggest that you do not come until you have been fever-free for 48 hours. During the interview process, we suggest that you determine your comfort level with this process with your would-be client and seek to understand what their comfort levels are. If they do not wish for you to come in with a cold,  industry standard would be that the family compensates you for missed work. Make sure this is addressed either in the interview or when they sign the contract.

When might families book you?

The sooner the better! The sooner you are contacted, the easier it will be for you to determine how you can best help your clients. It is possible for you to be booked up to 6 months out. We recommend finding one or two other nannies in your area if you would like to have people that can cover for you in an emergency.

What if a baby comes early or a family wants to extend their coverage?

This is super common. We suggest that parents check in with you 6 weeks prior to their due date and then every 2 weeks until they give birth. When they go into labor, have them contact you on the way to the hospital and then keep you updated as to when they will be released. We love being there the first night home because being at the hospital is exhausting. If a baby has a NICU,  ask for them to keep you in the loop. 

You may have other clients already booked after your current client. If your current client wants to extend their time, encourage them to speak about this soon. Attempt to keep the set nights if your next family is flexible. If not, work with each family to do what is best for all schedules involved.

What about standby nights and  cancellations?

If a client needs a short notice night (under 24 hour notice) and you are able to accommodate, there is typically a standby fee of $50 added to that night. 

If clients would like to reduce the amount of nights or end services, ask that they give a 2 week notice so that you can  let other families know you're available. It might be tempting for parents to end services the first time the baby sleeps through the night, but let them know that it is sometimes a one time thing before it becomes a pattern. 

At the end of the day, these are little lives that you are responsible for. This is something we take very seriously. Our top recommendation is that you have everything negotiated ahead of time and documented in a contract. Most problems come from lack of communication and if you can have all of the scenarios thought through ahead of time that allows you to enjoy your job to the fullest.


Still don't see your question here? Feel free to contact us!
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